What Is Boondock Camping?

what is boondock camping

The idea of camping may seem foreign to those who live in cities, where campgrounds and backcountry sites are scarce. However, camping can be done anywhere there’s a little space and a supply of wood and water.

So, what is boondock camping? Essentially, it’s camping without access to facilities such as a campground.

But why would anyone choose to leave the comforts of a campground to go boondocking? Is it safe to do so? Let’s look at boondocking and find out why you might want to try it out.

Boondock Camping

what is boondock camping

Boondock camping is an outdoor version of urban camping, a form of self-sufficient camping (i.e., not in a city park or national forest). Both forms of camping are self-contained and can include all the comforts of home, such as electrical, plumbing, and water services.

There are no official boondocking sites. However, there are various websites dedicated to the boondocking experience where users can park up at some preset location (sometimes with rights to stay on designated land indefinitely), provided there is a spot that suits their needs and sufficient woodcraft skills, in contrast with urban camping experiences in which you might be confined within designated areas or a campsite.

There is a wide array of boondocking options, from vast open spaces to an empty spare room in a house or apartment.

Your needs can greatly dictate your location, from just parking your pickup to living out of cars, tents, and trailers. Some like to cruise the interstates, looking for a car layover and picking up wood.

There isn’t much need for privacy with the truck cab opening directly up to your desired campsite, so it may be easier on that camping supply list if you want some more intimate space.

See also  How to Shower When Camping

Why Boondock?

Boondocking can be a cheaper way to travel, especially if you’re looking for a backpacker-style trip without the need to pay expensive campgrounds fees. It can also be safer than staying in a campground, as you can avoid some of the risks that come with camping in a populated area, such as bear and human encounters.

With all the conveniences of home, like power and water, you can save money and reduce your carbon footprint. You’re also more likely to be able to find a spot to boondock, as there are fewer reservations available than campgrounds.

Is Boondocking Safe?

what is boondock camping

While it’s common to hear about close calls with bears and other wildlife while camping, boondocking can be considerably safer than staying in a campground.

The biggest issue you can face while boondocking is the risk of not finding a spot to park.

Luckily, nearly all public land and many private properties have an online reservation system that allows you to make a spot available.

Plus, when you park in an open field, you’ll likely have fewer encounters with wildlife.

With all of this said, there is always the risk of not finding a spot to park and spending the night in your vehicle. This is why it’s important to research options for getting water and power before setting off to boondock, so you don’t run out of supplies.

Where to Go Boondocking?

what is boondock camping

Luckily, there are many places to go boondocking throughout the country. Places like national parks and BLM public lands, state parks, and campgrounds (both public and private) throughout America are perfect for boondocking.

See also  Is It Warmer To Sleep Naked In A Sleeping Bag?

It’s also good to search for boondocking spots on social media, as many adventurous people post about them.

Pros and Cons of Boondocking

Boondocking has plenty of benefits, but it’s also worth considering potential downsides before choosing to boondock.

Pros

-It’s cheaper than staying at a campground

-Avoiding the risks associated with camping in a populated area

-It’s easy to find spots to park at

-Can be safer than camping in a campground

-More freedom and flexibility than staying in a campground

Cons

-It’s more expensive than camping in a campground (though not always)

-You may have to pay for water and power if you don’t find space to boondock

-It can be more difficult to find spots to park compared to public lands or private properties

-It’s a little more demanding on the wallet compared to camping options on a campground

Tips for Finding a Spot to Boondock

Boondocking can be as straightforward or as complicated as you make it. To get the most out of your trip, make sure you do the following:

Research options for getting water and power before setting off to boondock. Make sure you have the gear necessary for boondocking (see below).

Find a spot that’s not too far from your intended destination in case of emergencies.

Things You’ll Need Before Boondocking.

Before heading out on your boondocking adventure, make sure you have the gear necessary for taking care of yourself and your vehicle while on the road:

-Toilet paper

-Towels

-Water

-Food (for self-catering)

-First aid kit

-Flashlight/torch/headlamp/lantern/candle(s)

-Knife (if possible)

-Cat litter box and litter box liner

See also  We Reviewed The Best 8 Person Tents Available For 2021

-Spare tire, jack, lug wrench, and tire repair kit (if possible)

-Spare gas canister or container if you’re planning to stay longer than 24 hours or are going to be driving more than 10 miles per day

-Spare tire, jack, lug wrench, and tire repair kit (if possible)

-Spare water filter for drinking water

-Water container for drinking water -Water-purifying tablets/water softener if you’re planning to stay longer than 24 hours or are going to be driving more than 10 miles per day

-Extra gas (for self-catering)

Summary

Boondocking can be a cheaper way to travel, especially if you’re looking for a backpacker-style trip without the need to pay expensive campgrounds fees. It can also be safer than staying in a campground, as you can avoid some of the risks that come with camping in a populated area, such as bear and human encounters.

With all the conveniences of home, like power and water, you can save money and reduce your carbon footprint. You’re also more likely to be able to find a spot to boondock, as there are fewer reservations available than campgrounds.

There are plenty of places to go boondocking, but it’s a good idea to research and find one that works for you. Boondocking can have lots of benefits, but it’s also worth considering potential downsides before choosing to boondock.

Previous Article
what to look for in hiking boots

What To Look For In Hiking Boots?

Next Article
what are hiking sticks for

What Are Hiking Sticks For?

Related Posts